Courses

The courses below are generally offered in our department. They are divided into introductory coursescourses for music majorsensembles, and lessons.

To view complete course descriptions for the current or the upcoming semester, see the Class Search page on registrar.nd.edu

Introductory Courses 

MUS 10090 - Theory for Non-Majors
An introduction to the materials and structure of Western tonal art music, including pitch, rhythm, meter, scales and keys, intervals, chords, harmonic progressions and voice-leading, and form.
3.000 Credit hours

MUS 10101 - Music and the Christian Tradition, 1500-1800
This course covers sacred art music and hymnody from the years just prior to the Protestant Reformation until the late eighteenth century. We will look at art music from the Catholic, Lutheran, and Anglican traditions, and congregational hymnody from the Lutheran, Reformed (Calvinist), and Anabaptist traditions. We will examine the development of distinct musical traditions among the Lutherans and Anglicans, but also the continued use (by Lutherans in particular) of chant and polyphonic music composed by (and for) Catholics, at times with altered texts. Topics to be covered include sacred music on the eve of the Reformation, Luther's theology of music, Calvin's position on the role of music in the church, music and the Counter- (or Catholic) Reformation, music in the Catholic and Lutheran liturgies, music and various devotional movements, Mary in the Lutheran musical tradition, the music of nuns, the musical influence of Venice and Rome on German Catholics and Lutherans, the psalm motets of the Anglicans, Lutheran organ music, the Bach cantata and Handelian oratorio, and psalmody in Colonial America. No musical background or music-reading ability is required.
3.000 Credit hours

MUS 10111 - Introduction to Eighteenth-Century Music
Introduction to the major composers and musical genres of the 18th century. Composers studied include Vivaldi, Bach, Handel, C.P.E. Bach, Gluck, Mozart, and Haydn; musical genres studied include the cantata, concerto, sonata, fantasia, quartet, opera, and oratorio. Readings include reactions and criticisms of 18th-century listeners, and writings of modern music scholars.
3.000 Credit hours

MUS 10125 - Literature & Opera
In this course, the full title of which is "Taking Liberties: From Book to Libretto, or French Literature Goes to the Opera" and which is being taught in English for the first time, we will be looking at a series of "parent" texts, written originally in French, and their operatic "offspring." Our objective will be less to highlight textual difference, although in certain cases that is far from being an uninteresting area of investigation, than to appreciate the theme and variation of, let us say, Merimée's Carmen and the treatment she gets in Bizet's opera. Among the text/operas we will examine as books (in English translation or in the original French depending on individual student preference) and as operas (DVD projections with subtitles) will be "The Barber of Seville"(Beaumarchais/Rossini); "The Marriage of Figaro" (Beaumarchais/Mozart); "Don Juan" (Molière) and "Don Giovanni" (Mozart); Manon Lescaut (Prévost/Puccini), "Carmen" (Mérimée/Bizet). We may try for one more: either "Le roi s'amuse" (Hugo)/"Rigoletto" (Verdi) or "La dame aux camélias" (Dumas)/ "La Traviata" (Verdi). As a so-called "appreciation" course, students need not necessarily know French or music theory. What is required are open minds, eyes and ears. There will be two papers, the second being more ambitious than the first, and a final exam. Prerequisite: 300 level literature or music course or permission of instructor. This course does fulfill a 400 level requirement for French majors. This course does not fulfill a 20000 level class for Music majors.
3.000 Credit hours

MUS 10131 - Introduction to Jazz
A music appreciation course requiring no musical background and no prerequisites. General coverage of the significant musicians, styles, and structures of jazz music. Departmental Approval to take class requires submission to Prof. Dwyer (106 Ricci Band Rehearsal Hall) of a one (1) page printed hard copy request containing student's name, ID#, email address, and one-paragraph statement of the student's reason for wanting to take the course.
3.000 Credit hours

MUS 10132 - Modern Jazz
A study of the jazz performers and practices of the latter half of the twentieth century to today -- the roots, stylistic developments and directions of individual artists, small combos, and big bands, using recordings, videos, and live concerts. No musical experience is required.
3.000 Credit hours

MUS 10141 - Understanding World Music
This course is a gateway to the study of music around the world. Rather than thinking of different musics as a number of regionally defined systems, we will look at a number of ways in which this social and cultural phenomenon may be understood. This course, therefore, takes a thematic approach to the question of studying music, whether it is oceans away or just around the corner, and whether people might agree on calling it `music¿ or not. At a time when distances no longer seem to matter much and categories appear to account for little, this course addresses questions along the lines of how to think about music, before looking at where it comes from and what systems it might follow. The course is open to majors and non-majors.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10150 - Music of the Catholic Rite
A study of the music composed for the Mass, the Office hours (primarily Vespers), and the Requiem Mass from the Middle Ages to the present day. The musical repertoire of each era is examined both from a purely musical standpoint and in light of the reactions of various popes, from John XXIII through Pius X, to the sacred music of their day. Documents on sacred music issued after Vatican II also are examined in relation to postconciliar church music for both the choir and the congregation.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10160 - Taking Liberties: From Book to Libretto, or French Literature Goes to the Opera
In this course, which may be taught in either French or in English, we will be looking a series of parent texts, written originally in French, and their operatic offspring. Works include The Barber of Seville (Beaumarchais/Rossini); The Marriage of Figaro (Beaumarchais/Mozart); Don Juan (Molière) and Don Giovanni (Mozart); Manon Lescaut (Prévost/Puccini), Carmen (Mérimée/Bizet).
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10190 - Introduction to Classical Music
Historical survey of Western art music from the Middle Ages to the present, with emphasis on the study of selected significant vocal and instrumental works.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10192 - Program Music from the Baroque Period through the 20th Century
This course will involve the study of instrumental music that was written to convey non-musical ideas derived from novels, plays, poetry, nature, nationalism, etc. It will also consider the relevance of the musical compositions within a historical context by incorporating the discussion of topics that directly relate to the lives of musicians and composers: politics, love, war, and religion.
3.000 Credit hours 

Music: 1945-1980
This seminar will track a thirty-five year period in (mostly) American music, or music that was derived from American models. During this time music existed in three, intertwined strands: jazz, rock and roll, and "classical." This course will acquaint you with various musical styles and ideas, but will also consider how technology, marketing, demographic shifts, and other social changes shaped the music that was created. Music 1945-1980 will examine the avant-garde concert music of the period, and American and British popular music that coexisted and sometimes cross-pollenated with the 'classical' avant-garde. Jazz styles to be covered will include Swing, Bop, Cool, and Jazz Rock. Popular music will include early Rock and Roll, the British invasion, Vietnam war era. No knowledge of musical notation will be required for this seminar.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 20142 - Music In Africa
Africa's musical culture is as diverse as the landmass, peoples, and languages of the continent. Africans' social systems, politics, their economics, and their religions are integrated with music as creative and expressive form. Like any human cultures in the world, African music has historical and ecological contexts that inform the meanings various communities make of, and express in their music. As a survey course, the class will explore the diversity of cultural and musical expressions in Africa, how Africans create, perform, think about, and use music in their lives. Special attention will be paid to traditional, popular and religious music genres with specific regional examples. Also issues related to intra-African and global components of the production and consumption of music will be explored.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 20162 - Music and the Olympics: A Soundtrack for Competition, Ceremony, and Celebration
A survey course of Music's role and history in athletic competition, training, ceremonies, and celebrations. Music's societal impact and power is evident in women's integration into the Olympics as well as music's role in nationalism and politics. In technologies, the development of sound reinforcement and acoustical architecture expanded the Olympic venue and ensemble size as well as the scope and content of ceremonial music. Music as the true "Universal Language" was used extensively to reach a world audience as the broadcast media commanded a global stage. All of these elements of culture, athletics, gender, technology, and nationalism present a vast dimension to study music in the Olympics.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 20491 - Instrumental Techniques
A hands-on music and liberal arts course designed to teach students instrumental techniques in preparation for experiential learning experiences within the local community and abroad. Students will receive instruction on wind and percussion instruments that will enable them to excel while outside the classroom. Students will apply these skills as directors and mentors in the Bandlink program and service opportunities overseas.
3.000 Credit hours

MUS 20651 - Ensemble Management
Students will learn pedagogical techniques to help them manage a large ensemble rehearsal. Students will receive one-on-one instruction from faculty as well as have extensive hands-on opportunities to practice these techniques. Students will serve as directors within the Bandlink program and share responsibility for classroom management, literature selection, instruction, logistics and budget.Students will learn pedagogical techniques to help them manage a large ensemble rehearsal. Students will receive one-on-one instruction from faculty as well as have extensive hands-on opportunities to practice these techniques. Students will serve as directors within the Bandlink program and share responsibility for classroom management, literature selection, instruction, logistics and budget.
3.000 Credit hours

MUS 20890 - The Business of Music
A historical survey of the synergistic relationship between music and business. Covering major technological, legal, and economic forces influencing the musical arts. This class will address the latest developments by studying historical practices, cutting-edge technologies, emergent business practices and global trends in both business and music.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 20941 - Vocal Physiology & Pedagogy
In this class, students will learn in detail the anatomical structures and processes that are involved in singing. They will also be introduced to important concepts and issues involved in vocal pedagogy. Coursework will involve class participation, reading assignments, tests, and a small project.
1.0 Credit hours 

MUS 30453 - Instrumental Conducting
Instrumental conducting provides basic to intermediate theory and technique for rehearsing and conducting instrumental ensembles. Presented in a participatory ensemble setting in which students conduct and play for their peers, the course provides opportunities for development and growth through peer feedback, video tape evaluation, and staff mentoring. Specific areas of instruction related to conducting will include fundamentals of score reading, baton technique, rehearsal techniques, and musical interpretation. As a significant portion of the course takes place in an ensemble setting, all students are expected to have performing experience on an instrument (brass, woodwind, percussion, string, piano, guitar), be able to read music notation competently, and participate as an instrumentalist in the class ensemble.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 40500 - Music Through Technology
Music through Technology is a lecture/lab course open primarily to CAPP and music majors, with consideration of other talented students. Lecture topics include the historical evolution of technology in music, surveying the influence that technology had on the music world, both from a creative standpoint to the accessibility and distribution of music to the masses. Other examples of technology's influence in music may include the development of multi-track recording on popular music, synthesizer, and midi technology, technology's applications for musical composition, and the adaptation of CD and mp3 formats to musical performers. The historical influence of technology is an illuminating foundation to current developments in the creative processes of music. Lab topics cover and introduction to current music technology including digital audio recording and editing, midi technology (sound and notation) and the digital management and distribution of music. Students will experience all of these technologies on an introductory level, but focus their interests on a technology-based final project to develop and display their acquired skills.
3.000 Credit hours 

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Courses for Music Majors

MUS 20001 - Harmony and Voice Leading (Theory I)
A systematic approach to the understanding and manipulation of the basic materials of music. Required of and intended for music majors and minors, but open to students with sufficient musical background.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 20002 - Music Theory II
A systematic approach to the understanding and manipulation of the basic materials of music. Required of and intended for music majors and minors, but open to students with sufficient musical background.
3.000 Credit hours

MUS 20011 - Musicianship I
Exercise and mastery of basic skills in music: melodic, harmonic, rhythmic, and keyboard. To be taken along with Theory I and II. Required of all students intending to major in music.
1.0 Credit hours 

MUS 20012 - Musicianship II
Exercise and mastery of basic skills in music: melodic, harmonic, rhythmic, and keyboard. To be taken along with Theory I and II. Required of all students intending to major in music.
1.0 Credit hours 

MUS 20101 - Medieval and Renaissance Music History I
A survey of music. The study of the major forms and styles in Western history. Required of music majors and minors, but open to students with sufficient musical background. MUS 20001 and MUS 20002 recommended before taking this class.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 20112 - Baroque Music (History II)
A survey of music. The study of the major forms and styles in Western history. Required of music majors. A survey of the styles and forms of Baroque music (ca. 1600 and 1750). Restricted to music majors; non-majors with sufficient musical background who wish to enroll in the class should contact the professor. Prerequisites: MUS 20001 (Theory I). It is strongly recommended that students also take MUS 20101 (History I) before enrolling in MUS 20112.
3.000 Credit hours

MUS 30003 - Chromatic Harmony (Theory III)
Studies in advanced harmony.
3.000 Credit hours

MUS 30004 - 20th-Century/Music Theory IV
Intended for music majors. The theoretical and historical sources and development of music from Debussy to the present.
3.000 Credits

MUS 30013 - Musicianship III
Exercise and mastery of more advanced skills in music: melodic, harmonic, rhythmic, keyboard, and score-reading. To be taken along with Theory III and IV. Required of all students majoring in music.
1.0 Credit hours 

MUS 30123 - Classical and Romantic Music (History III)
A survey of music. The study of the major forms and styles in Western history. Required of music majors and minors, but open to students with sufficient musical background.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 30400 - Piano Performance Class
Master class format designed to give piano students opportunities in which to perform. This course is to be taken by Piano Performance Majors or by permission of the instructor
1.0 Credit hours 

MUS 30400 - Piano Performance Class
Master class format designed to give piano students opportunities in which to perform. This course is to be taken by Piano Performance Majors or by permission of the instructor
1.0 Credit hours 

MUS 30451 - Conducting I
Basic techniques of instrumental and choral conducting. For music majors only or with special permission of the instructor.
2.000 Credit hours 

MUS 31360 - Composition
Creative writing in various forms, conventional and contemporary. Private instruction only. Must sign up in the Music Department Office (105 Crowley Hall) to get department approval.
1.0 TO 2.000 Credit hours 

MUS 40023 - Twentieth Century Russian Composers: Skryabin, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Shostakovitch
The analysis of works by Skryabin, Stravinsky, Prokofiev and Shostakovitch with particular attention to theories that have been developed to explain their music.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 40024 - Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky
Study and analysis of the music of Debussy, Ravel and Stravinsky up to 1920.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 40042 - Baroque Counterpoint
This course will focus on the practice of counterpoint - the writing of independent voices and their polyphonic combination. This course is designed primarily for music majors, but qualified non-majors are also welcome. (The prerequisite for the course is normally Theory I, but Theory for Non-Majors can also serve as a prerequisite.) We will study contrapuntal style and procedures of Bach through original student compositions in formal models of the 18th Century.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 40070 - Theory and Method in the Study of Ethnomusicology
This course offers an overview of major theories and methods in the study of music from the subdisciplinary perspectives of ethnomusicology and new musicology. Intended for advanced students with a working knowledge of music theory, the course offers grounding in current scholarship on the study of music through focusing on ethnomusicological query and ways in which it intersects with historical musicology. Music majors, as well as non majors who have a proficient level of music literacy, will find this course helpful in understanding, firstly, how recent scholarship studies various musics from around the world, and secondly, new theoretical approaches that have developed in musicology subsequent to encountering non-western music. The course will deal with issues such as musical systems, performance practice and context, as well as cultural and symbolic significance in music analysis.

MUS 40100 - Getting Medieval: Music and Technology in the Latin Middle Ages (800-1400)
Napster would never have been sued in the Middle Ages. Rather the culture embraced song, singing, and the free transmission of music in as many ways as possible. Music that was transmitted survived! This course is about how music was recorded, changing modes of transmission, and the interactions between the performer, the notator, the poet/dramatist and the scholar. How did media shape the messages of music? We begin in around 800, when a new technology slowly began to transform cultures of song in the West, to around 1400, when a system for recording music was fully developed that has been primary until the twentieth century. In the first half of the course, we study manuscripts and musical repertory from before, during and after the monumental changes of the Carolingian period. Students will sharpen their quills and prepare transcriptions for us to use; expertise in a variety of subjects will be well-received, from composition and music theory, to music performance, to Latin studies, history, and liturgics. A class project at mid-term will involve the reconstruction of a medieval Vespers service from the manuscripts we have been studying, singing antiphons by the nun Hildegard of Bingen, and working with manuscripts from the Rhineland, including one source that is the closest extant to Hildegard's own monastery as well as those prepared in her scriptorium. The second half of the course will focus on rhythm, music and poetry, and dramatic and narrative structures, ending with the performance of a liturgical drama, the scale of which will depend upon the numbers of students in the course, and their proclivities. We will examine dramatic musical works in their ritual contexts, from the Christmas cycle, to the Beauvais Play of Daniel, to saints' plays, to a range of Easter dramas. There will be an emphasis on the great "Fleury Playbook," the Circumcision office from Beauvais, and a satirical review from the 14th century, the Roman de Fauvel, starring a donkey who represents the seven deadly sins. All these musical works will be studied from original manuscripts. The course is open to graduate and professional students, as well as to undergraduates, and work will be geared to particular interests and abilities. The inter-disciplinary nature of the subject precludes prerequisites; all are welcome. The instructor's textbook on medieval music (WWNorton, 2011) will be given a test-drive in this course.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 40121 - Music: 1945-1980
Music 1945-1980 will examine the leading edge concerted music of the period, and American and British popular music (Jazz, rock and roll) that coexisted and sometimes cross-pollenated with the 'classical' avant-garde. Jazz styles to be covered will include Swing, Bop, Cool, and Jazz Rock. Popular music will include the Folk revival, early Rock and Roll, the British invasion, Vietnam war era. Concert music will involve the end of the neoclassical, the cult of Webern, electronic and computer music, John Cage and his followers, total serialism, and minimalism.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 40124 - Schubert: His Life and Works
A comprehensive survey of the life, cultural and historical contexts, and music of Franz Schubert (1797-1828).
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 40125 - Shakespeare and Verdi
An in-depth study of 19th-century Italian operatic adaptations of Shakespeare, with particular focus on Macbeth, Otello, and Falstaff by Giuseppe Verdi.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 40160 - Words and Music
We'll investigate three areas: (1) new psychological research on relationships between music and language, (2) how composers of many eras and cultures have set texts to music, (3) the uses of linguistic concepts in music theory and analysis. Units will include phonology (classification of sounds), prosody and rhythm, speech and melody, syntax and grammar, rhetoric and semantics (meaning).
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 40161 - Psalmody
This hands-on course will cover all the ways that the psalms have been sung in Jewish and Christian worship, from ancient times to the present. All the major styles and practices of monophonic and polyphonic singing, as well as keyboard accompaniment, will be included. We will also trace how the various ways of interpreting the psalm texts throughout history have shaped liturgical practices, prayer and spirituality, and the creation of hymnody.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 40402 - Piano Collaboration
This course is to be taken by Piano Performance Majors or by permission of the instructor. Pianists in this course have an opportunity to develop the specific skills and abilities needed for accompanying vocalists and/or instrumentalists, and are encouraged to bring their colleagues to class.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 40441 - Diction I - German
Elements and expressive techniques of German diction, utilizing the International Phonetic Alphabet.
1.000 Credit hours

MUS 40442 - Diction II - English, Italian
Elements and expressive techniques of English and Italian diction, utilizing the International Phonetic Alphabet.
1.0 Credit hours 

MUS 40443 - Diction III-French
Elements and expressive techniques of French diction, utilizing the International Phonetic Alphabet.
1.0 Credit hours 

MUS 40444 - French Vocal Literature
A survey of vocal literature in France from the 16th century to the present with an emphasis on comparative listening.
1.000 Credit hours

MUS 40490 - Orchestral Excerpts
Excerpts from the standard orchestral literature encompassing styles from the 18th century through the 20th century. Instructed by individual members of the faculty.
1.0 Credit hours 

MUS 40941 - Vocal Physiology and Pedagogy
In this class, students will learn in detail the anatomical structures and processes that are involved in singing. They will also be introduced to important concepts and issues involved in vocal pedagogy. Coursework will involve class participation, reading assignments, tests, and a small project.
1.0 Credit hours 

MUS 43160 - Music, Nation, State
This seminar explores the intersection of music with the nation and the state from the eighteenth through the twenty-first centuries, including topics such as music and the construction of national consciousness and national identity; music and propaganda; music and state control; music and war; and music and torture. Students will also become familiar with reading and writing musicological scholarship.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 50021 - Tonal Forms
This course engages the practice of hands-on analysis of musical form in compositions of the Baroque, Classical, and Romantic eras of music history. Our interaction with the music will be holistic, with light cast on the contribution of thematic design, key scheme, and large-scale harmonic pillars to the articulation of musical form. The focus will be on the main formal types characteristic throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries: basic phrase types (the period and sentence); binary and rounded binary; theme and variations; ternary and compound ternary; rondo; sonata form and sonata-rondo form. Much of the course will address the music itself, but there will also be required readings from select secondary sources, which will provide background on the relevant analytical methodologies. Course work will include weekly listening and score study, readings from the secondary literature, written analysis assignments, and a final exam.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 50022 - Schenkerian Analysis
This course will focus on techniques of analysis for music of the common practice era (Bach to Brahms) through study of the groundbreaking methodology developed by the Viennese music theorist Heinrich Schenker (1868-1935). Schenker's theory focuses on the interaction of harmony and voice leading on local, chord-to-chord levels of musical organization, what he termed the foreground, to the most global levels of large-scale structure, the background, and the intermediary levels through which he relates these two extremes - the middleground. But the theory is much more than a study of harmony and voice leading: it confronts these musical dimensions through their relationship with rhythmic, formal, and motivic aspects of musical organization, in essence aspiring to a holistic method of analysis that traces both the interrelatedness and tension among multiple aspects of musical structure. The class will engage Schenker's method primarily through hands on application of his approach to actual music. In the process, students will learn to express analytical insights through Schenker's own novel method of musical "graphing" which reinterprets aspects of traditional musical notation to communicate interpretive perceptions about actual pieces. We will also read from Schenker's own published analyses and theoretical writings and from select publications drawn from the enormous body of scholarship that has followed in his wake. In addition to the readings, the course will require weekly graphing assignments, classroom presentation of analytical work and individual research, and a final analysis project. The course is open to all students who have completed Theory III (MUS 30003) as a prerequisite.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 50024 - The Chamber Music of Schubert, Schumann, and Brahms
The course focuses on the practice of hands-on analysis of the chamber music of these three nineteenth-century masters of the genre. Our engagement with the music will be holistic, with light cast on each composer's diverse yet related approaches to aspects of form, tonal-harmonic language, thematic process and motivic development, and rhythmic-metric characteristics. Secondarily, we will study the important historical relationships among Schubert, Schumann, and Brahms, as exhibited in the technical characteristics of their music. Much of the course will address the music itself, but there will also be readings from select secondary sources, which will provide background on the relevant analytical methodologies. Assignments will include weekly listening and score study, readings from the scholarly literature, periodic analysis assignments and short essays, and a final exam and final paper.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 50101 - Gregorian Chant in the Roman Rite
Vocal Sacred Music I is devoted primarily to Gregorian Chant, with some study toward the end of the semester of medieval polyphonic works based on chant. The course will cover matters of liturgy, performance practice, musical forms, notation, and sources. The course is open to upper-class music majors.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 50102 - Polyphony: Vocal Sacred Music II
Vocal Sacred Music II is devoted to Renaissance polyphony (ca. 1400-1600). The course will cover matters of liturgy, performance practice, musical forms, notation, sources and major composers. The course is open to upper-class music majors and graduate students in the Medieval Institute and Master of Sacred Music Program.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 50103 - Transcribing Early Notations and Making Computerized Editions of Gregorian Chant and Early Polyphony
The course will focus both on how to interpret early notations and how to make computerized modern editions using MakeMusic's Finale program for Mac or PC. Topics to be addressed will include "barlines: yes or no?", "when to use musica ficta and how to indicate it," "problems of text underlay," "when to transpose for the convenience of the singers," "reduce the original note shapes or make a diplomatic transcription?" and "the advantages and disadvantages of computer programs that create quadratic Gregorian notation."
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 50113 - Vocal Sacred Music III
This is a seminar designed for graduate students in the Master of Sacred Music program. Senior music majors may also register for this course (under this number only). The course covers sacred art music composed for performance within a liturgical context as well as in public concerts between ca. 1600 and 1750, or from Monteverdi and Schütz to Bach and Handel, and examines this repertoire both from an analytical perspective and in relation to its various performance contexts. Students will read a variety of studies from the disciplines of musicology, music theory, and church history (including papal legislation on music), and will be expected to be able to discuss the works under consideration in class from a variety of perspectives, including musical form, musical style, harmonic language, and liturgical use. Questions of the relationship between music and liturgy, devotion, spirituality, and contemporary culture will also be considered. The hymnody of this era will also be examined. The course will also include the examination of contemporary musical sources, both print and manuscript. Students will be asked to make several class presentations throughout the semester, and to write a research paper of at least 15 pages. Grading will be based on class participation, class presentations, and the research paper.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 50114 - Vocal Sacred Music III: Cantatas, Passions, and Oratorios of Bach and Handel
This is a seminar designed for graduate students in the Master of Sacred Music program. Music majors who will be seniors may also register for this course (under this number only). The course covers the cantatas, Passions, and Mass in B minor of Bach, and the oratorios of Handel, and examines this repertoire both from an analytical perspective and in relation to its various performance contexts. Students will read a variety of studies from the disciplines of musicology, music theory, and church history, and will be expected to be able to discuss the works under consideration in class from a variety of perspectives, including musical form, musical style, harmonic language, and liturgical use. Questions of the relationship between music and liturgy, devotion, spirituality, and contemporary culture will also be considered. Students will be asked to make several class presentations throughout the semester, and to write one or two short papers, and a research paper of at least 15 pages. Grading will be based on class participation, class presentations, and the papers.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 50121 - 19th Century Sacred Music
A study of sacred music between 1750 and 1900. The course will examine the sacred art music of this period, both that composed for liturgical use and that composed for the concert stage, and will also cover important developments during this period such as the Cecilian Reform Movement. The course is open to upper-class music majors and graduate students in the Master of Sacred Music Program.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 50123 - Heinrich Heine & The Lied
The history of German Romantic song in the late 19th century through the poetry of Heinrich Heine (1797-1856).
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 50124 - The Song Cycle from 1800 to the Present
When the century turned over a new leaf in 1800, composers began experimenting with new ways to link songs for voice and piano together in larger groupings called "cycles." As song became a more important genre for 19th-century musicians, the cycle was a way to make song--a miniature genre--challenge the established big genres (symphony, opera, string quartet) in length and complexity. In this course, we start with the first cycles by Johann Friedrich Reichardt and go on from there to works by Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Loewe, Brahms, and many more in Germany; to the migration of song cycles to France, in particular the great cycles by Gabriel Fauré; and to numerous 20th- and 21st-century song cycles by the likes of Britten, Krenek, Schoeck, Eisler, Dutilleux, Poulenc, Hindemith, and more.
3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 50440 - Vocal Performance Techniques
Development of interpretation skills pertaining to songs and operatic literature. For advanced undergraduate students only.
1.0 Credit hours 

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Ensembles

MUS 10201 - Brass Ensemble
Special groups of brass instruments meeting weekly. Literature covered will depend upon the nature of the ensembles organized and student enrollment. Will not apply to overload.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours

MUS 10203 - Percussion Ensemble
This ensemble is organized according to the needs of those who audition through the regular process at the beginning of each semester. It consists of those for whom the larger ensembles are inappropriate. Examples include Clarinet Choir, Percussion Ensemble, Percussion Ensemble and other band instrument ensembles.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10210 - Chorale
A select group devoted to the singing of diversified sacred and secular literature. Performs at Notre Dame and on tour.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10212 - Collegium Musicum
Performance ensemble focusing on sacred and secular music of the medieval era and Renaissance. Does not apply to overload.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10221 - Glee Club
Notre Dame's traditional all-male choir.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10222 - Collegium Musicum
A select choir that concentrates its performances in the medieval and Renaissance repertoire.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10230 - Jazz Band
Open through audition.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10231 - New Orleans Brass Band
An ensemble performing the traditional and new music of New Orleans style brass bands.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10233 - Jazz Improvisation
Students will study scales, key centers, and chords, in order to develop improvisation skills using melodic and rhythmic variation, chordal and modal techniques, and aural transcriptions of recorded solos.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours

MUS 10240 - Symphonic Winds
This ensemble prepares and performs traditional and contemporary works for band in a smaller, wind ensemble setting, rehearsing twice per week, with a short concert tour and two concerts during the semester.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10241 - Wind Ensembles
Wind and brass ensembles assembled for performance with special instrumentation.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10242 - Symphonic Band
This ensemble prepares and performs traditional and contemporary works for band in a large concert ensemble setting, rehearsing twice per week, with a short concert tour and two concerts during the semester.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10244 - Fall Concert Band
This ensemble prepares and performs traditional and contemporary works for band in a large concert ensemble setting, rehearsing once per week with one concert near the end of the semester.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10245 - University Band
This ensemble will provide a traditional concert band experience for brass, woodwind and percussion players in the Notre Dame community. Under the direction of Dr. Kenneth Dye and the Notre Dame band staff, the University band prepares and performs a wide variety of music, including everything from marches, overtures, and pop melodies to the traditional Notre Dame favorites. Rehearsals take place in the Band Building. Those who are able may register for MUS 10245 "University Band" for one credit, although registration is not required to participate. Application for membership can be made by contacting the band office.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10246 - Varsity Band
Performs for athletic events and special functions. Does not apply to overload.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10247 - Concert Winds
This ensemble prepares and performs traditional and contemporary works for band in a small, wind ensemble setting, rehearsing once per week with one concert near the end of the semester.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10249 - Marching Band
Performs for athletic events and special functions. Admission by audition.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10250 - Orchestra
Performs music from the 18th to the 20th century in several concerts a year.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 10251 - Chamber Orchestra
An ensemble of 10-15 players drawn primarily from the ranks of the Notre Dame orchestra.
0.0 TO 1.000 Credit hours 

MUS 30200 - Chamber Music
Study and performance of selected chamber compositions. Intended for music majors or with special permission.
1.0 TO 2.000 Credit hours 

MUS 30211 - Opera Production
This class focuses on Mozart's Le nozze di Figaro. In this course both students and instructors will be engaged in a team effort to approach the production of opera both through critical understanding of the work (sources, context, meanings) and their active participation in a real opera production. The opera will be performed on campus in the course of the semester, with students involved at different levels, whether singing, playing in the orchestra, organizing the stage sets, or participating in other aspects of opera performance, from promotion and management to scholarly work for program notes and other critical essays. The class is team-taught Dr. Beudert, the director of the Opera Notre Dame program and of Eugene Opera in Oregon and by Dr. Polzonetti, a musicologist specializing in 18th-century Italian opera. Students who take the class for 3 credit hours will have to write a paper and will have a final exam.
0.0 TO 3.000 Credit hours 

MUS 30213 - Opera Workshop
The course will end with workshop performances of various scenes, accompanied by piano, taking place in early December at a venue to be announced.
0.0 TO 3.000 Credit hours 

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Lessons

Lessons on all major instruments are offered to all students (music majors or non-music majors) at the University of Notre Dame for either credit or no credit.

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